22 Aug 2017

 
  

March 28, 2012 - Filed under: Antique Chaise Longues — Mandy

A chaise longue translated in French means “long chair”. It is an upholstered sofa in the shape of a chair which is long enough to support the legs. Originating in France in the 16th Century and used by Royals, it is also said Cleopatra rested upon a chaise longue.

Originally they were only used as indoor furniture and were upholstered in fabrics that only the rich people could afford. The chaise longue has a back rest and a single armrest on one side and were used to sleep on one’s side as opposed to lying flat – a relaxing piece of furniture

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March 27, 2012 - Filed under: Arts and Crafts — Mandy

Stanley Webb Davies (1894–1978) was one of the leading designers in the Cotswold School style, which helped to take the traditional handmade elements of Arts & Crafts furniture into the twentieth century. Like his associate, Robert “Mouse Man” Thompson, Davies had a trademark signature: a rectangular monogram containing his initials, the date of manufacture and initials of the craftsman who made the piece.

Stanley Davies was born in Darwen, Lancashire, to a Quaker mill-owning family. Having graduated from Oxford, he initially went into the family mill business, but decided to further his talent for woodworking with an apprenticeship under the acclaimed Cotswold School designer Romney Green.

In 1923, Davies started his own Arts & Crafts furniture company in Cumbria, building a house and workshop near Windermere, which he called “Gatesbield”, meaning a shelter for small animals. He married Emily Thomas, herself a skilled woodcarver, in the same year. Emily was a nature lover, and their house was, and still is, full of charming carvings of wildlife, country scenes and mottos crafted by her and her husband. Upon Davies’ death, the house was bequeathed to a Quaker housing association, and today offers sheltered accommodation for the elderly, the beautiful woodwork carefully preserved.

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Below is an example of Stanley Davies work, an oak serving trolley

- Filed under: Arts and Crafts — Mandy

Arthur Simpson is one of the forgotten masters of English Arts & Crafts Furniture. Born in Cumbria, in 1857, he showed an early flair for wood carving, taking two apprenticeships and working in London before returning to Kendal to establish his famous Handicrafts workshop. The clean simple lines and superb workmanship of his Arts & Crafts furniture found a ready market locally. Simpson died in 1922, but the workshop continued under the guidance of his son until 1950. Many of Simpson’s finely crafted antique cabinets, chairs and chests can still be found in Cumbria today.

Arthur Simpson started his apprenticeship at the age of 14, with a Kendal cabinet maker. At the age of 18 he transferred his skills to Gillow’s of Lancaster, where he showed tremendous scope as a woodcarver. Simpson then worked under Samuel Barfield in Leicester, returning to Kendal as an ‘Architectural and General Wood Carver’.

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Below is a fine example of Arthur Simpson’s work

 

- Filed under: Arts and Crafts — Mandy

Arthur Simpson is one of the forgotten masters of English Arts & Crafts Furniture. Born in Cumbria, in 1857, he showed an early flair for wood carving, taking two apprenticeships and working in London before returning to Kendal to establish his famous Handicrafts workshop. The clean simple lines and superb workmanship of his Arts & Crafts furniture found a ready market locally. Simpson died in 1922, but the workshop continued under the guidance of his son until 1950. Many of Simpson’s finely crafted antique cabinets, chairs and chests can still be found in Cumbria today. Below is a fine example of Simpsons work, an oak Stationery cabinet.

Arthur Simpson started his apprenticeship at the age of 14, with a Kendal cabinet maker. At the age of 18 he transferred his skills to Gillow’s of Lancaster, where he showed tremendous scope as a woodcarver. Simpson then worked under Samuel Barfield in Leicester, returning to Kendal as an ‘Architectural and General Wood Carver’.

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March 21, 2012 - Filed under: Desks — Mandy

Late 18th Century writing tables were raised on slender square tapering legs or slender turned legs of simple outline. Both terminating in Castor’s. In the early 19th Century a heavier leg turned with rings became more popular, which became more robust as the Century progressed. An early 19th Century development was the writing table with end supports.  Writing tables are also referred to as “bureau plat” when in the French Style such as Louis XVI style.

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Edwardian Writing Desk

 

- Filed under: Antique Tables — Mandy

Nests of tables were an ingenious space saving late 18th Century invention. Consisting of three or four tables. Edwardian nests of tables are about two thirds the height of Regency ones and considerably less expensive. Early nests were light and elegantly simple in design and they became more ornate in the 19th Century before returning to the Georgian style. The most common woods used were mahogany and rosewood. The largest table tops are frequently paler than the smaller tables, with more often being exposed to the sunlight.

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Edwardian Period Mahogany Nest Tables

- Filed under: Antique Tables — Mandy

The fashion for taking tea and other refreshments such as chocolate undoubtedly led to more occasional use of folding side tables, some were even made in pairs, one with baize interior for games and one with polished surface for use when entertaining.  The latter are referred to as tea tables

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Pair Card Tables

- Filed under: Antique Tables — Mandy

The fashion for round tables which could be used as dining tables, loo tables (a popular game enjoyed well into the 19th Century) or occasional tables increased considerably in the first years of the 19th Century. One identifiable type of table which was made between about 1820 and 1880 was one with a triangular base and hollow sides, known as a hyperboloid base. 

- Filed under: Arts and Crafts — Mandy

The arts and crafts movement represents a crucial period in the history of decorative and applied arts. Towards the end of the 20th Century a hundred years after the peak of the movement, arts and crafts design is enjoying a strong resurgence in popularity.

John Ruskin was the leading art and architecture critic of mid 19th Century Britain and the major formative influence in the arts and crafts movement.

Strongly influenced by Ruskin’s writings, William Morris become the true founder of the arts and crafts movement. Morris (1834-96) agreed with Ruskin’s aesthetic theories and combined them with his socialist beliefs to formulate his complex opinions an art, design and society.

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March 15, 2012 - Filed under: Antique Credenzas — Mandy

Credenzas became fashionable during the second half of the 19th Century. The top of  a credenza would often be made from marble or inlaid wood, the body made from burnished or polished wood usually with marquetry inlay. A central cupboard would be flanked by symmetrical glass display cabinets or open shelving.

Today credenzas are used as a type of sideboard in the dining room. Originally in Italian the word credenza meant “belief” and in the 16th Century the act of “credenza” was the servant tasting the food and drinks for the Lord or other important persons, to test for poisons. The name was the passed to the room where the act took place, then eventually to the furniture.

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